Most recent Digital Exchange Webinar “Integrating Community Health, Arts and Culture” – Wed., June 28th @ 12:00PM EST

Most recent Digital Exchange Webinar “Integrating Community Health, Arts and Culture”  –  Wed., June 28th @ 12:00PM EST

Most recent Digital Exchange Webinar “Integrating Community Health, Arts and Culture” – Wed., June 28th @ 12:00PM EST

Across the country, new health systems approaches are leveraging multi-sector programs and policies to foster a culture of health in rural communities. Webinar participants will learn from Arkansas, California, Kentucky, Wisconsin, and national models that prioritize community needs and resources through engagement with numerous partners to expand access and improve individual experiences with healthcare and healthy living.
Mario Gutierrez is the Executive Director of the Center for Connected Health Policy, the federally designated Telehealth Policy Resource Center since 2012. He is certifed as a Principal Investigator by its parent organization, the Public Health Institute based in Oakland, California. He brings more than 30 years of experience in California’s non-prot health and health philanthropy sectors, and has extensive expertise in federal health policy matters. CCHP is firmly established as an unbiased, highly respected policy leader in telehealth in California and nationally, and has published a number of policy briefs and reports on this subject. Prior to joining CCHP, Mr. Gutierrez was a Program Director with The California Endowment, where he led several major “signature” health care initiatives, including a 10-year, $20 million groundbreaking strategy to deploy telehealth services throughout California. In 2006 CTEC was selected and funded by HRSA/OAT to become California’s first regional telehealth resource center. Mr. Gutierrez is recognized as one of the nation’s leading experts in the field of telehealth and telehealth policy, has presented at over fty national meetings and conferences, and has chaired several educational panels at the American Telemedicine Association Annual meeting and its Policy Forum. Mr. Gutierrez has been quoted on the subject of telehealth policies in several national publications including The Economist and Time Magazine. In 2013, he was invited to attend a meeting of the White House Rural Council to present on telehealth policy issues. For the Past six years he has chaired the Rural Policy Research Institute (RUPRI) Rural Human Services Advisory Panel. Mr. Gutierrez also serves on the Board of Directors for both the Rural Health Information Hub and the Oregon Community Health Information Network (OCHIN). For over 30 years, Mr. Gutierrez has accompanied his wife, Debra Johnson, MD, on over 15 international volunteer pediatric reconstructive surgical missions, providing logistical and organizational support for team members. Mr. Gutierrez holds a Masters Degree in Public Health, with an emphasis in Health Planning/Policy, from the University of California, Berkeley; Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Miami; and is fluent in Spanish.
Dr. Jennifer Conner has extensive experience in behavioral research, clinical health services research, grant administration, community-based public health programming, and policy evaluation. She has brought together academic institutions, hospitals, schools, faith-based organizations, community-based organizations, municipalities, and non-prots to investigate and evaluate a broad range of health topics, including childhood obesity, respiratory illness, traumatic brain injury, cancer, and birth defects. She has also examined healthcare system topics such as access to quality care, safety net benefits, and incentive-based insurance. Dr. Conner served as an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health, supporting community-based projects in San Antonio and its four contiguous counties. In 2011, Dr. Conner was appointed as Policy Subcommittee Chair for the San Antonio Mayor’s Fitness Council. She launched several faith-based obesity prevention programs and developed several community gardens in the area. More recently, Dr. Conner worked with the Arkansas Foundation for Medical Care to investigate health disparities and evaluate disease prevention and health promotion strategies across the state. She is now continuing those eorts with the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service. Dr. Conner serves on the Lake Village Economic Development Commission and was instrumental in launching the Mayors Mentoring Mayors program to advance comprehensive community health and wellness. Dr. Conner was appointed to the Arkansas Coalition for Obesity Prevention Executive Committee and served as Built Environment Subcommittee Co-Chair for many years. Dr. Conner recently graduated from the Delta Regional Authority DLI Executive Academy and was accepted into the Community Development Institute–Central.
Anne Basting is a theater artist and educator demonstrating the potential of storytelling and creative expression to improve the lives of elders experiencing cognitive impairment. Across a variety of formats and platforms—theater, memoir, narrative, collaborative public performance, and academic research—Basting has developed an alternative concept of aging, one that focuses on its possibilities as well as its challenges and views sustained emotional connections as critical to our well-being as we age. In 2016, she was named a MacArthur Fellow. Her breakthrough project, TimeSlips, is an improvisational storytelling method in which older adults with cognitive impairment imagine stories and poems in response to inspiring cues. Basting used a collection of poems by the residents of Luther Manor Home in Wisconsin to create and stage a theater piece with the residents in 2000. She then refined and transformed TimeSlips into a formal therapy protocol guided by her fundamental insight that the creation of new stories can be an enriching substitute for lost memories. Basting has since created several theater pieces with elder collaborators around specic themes or community issues. The most ambitious of these, The Penelope Project (2010), grew out of a series of writing, visual arts, and music and movement exercises that imagines the life of Penelope as she awaits the return of Odysseus in Homer’s tale. Other projects, such as Islands of Milwaukee (2012) and The Crossings (2014), have encouraged community engagement, promoted intergenerational interactions, and raised awareness around elder safety. Anne Basting received a B.A. from Colorado College (1987), an M.A. (1990) from the University of Wisconsin, and a Ph.D. (1995) from the University of Minnesota. She is currently a professor of theater in the Peck School of the Arts at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee (UWM), founder (in 1998) and president of TimeSlips Creative Storytelling, and founder and coordinator of Creative Trust Milwaukee. She is the author of Forget Memory: Creating Better Lives for People with Dementia (2009), The Stages of Age: Performing Age in Contemporary American Culture (1998), and The Penelope Project: An Arts-Based Odyssey to Change Elder Care (2016) in addition to numerous articles, plays, and public performances.
Roughly every three weeks, these Digital Exchanges will offer an opportunity for folks to come together and engage with leaders working across the dynamic range of fields that compose the foundation of rural creative placemaking. Each of these one hour Digital Exchanges will feature 2-4 voices from across the country, sharing specifc themes, challenges, and opportunities we collectively encounter in this work. Learn more at www.ruralgeneration.org/digital-exchange

Upcoming Digital Exchange Webinars

This Digital Exchange series is made possible through the support of the National Endowment for the Arts, the McKnight Foundation, and RUPRI – Rural Policy Research Institute, and is produced at the Outpost collaborative space in Winona, Minnesota, national headquarters of Art of the Rural.